Mental health inquiry a unique opportunity, let’s take it

The key groups calling for an inquiry into our mental health system welcome today’s announcement says the YesWeCare.nz health funding coalition.

The Government will announce the details of an Independent Mental Health Inquiry after 4 pm today in Wellington.

Bereaved Whānau Network spokesperson Jane Stevens, who lost her son Nicky to suicide in 2015, says real change starts with real people’s voices being heard.

“The success of the inquiry will depend on the broad participation of those directly affected by our mental health crisis and suicide and sustained political pressure and momentum to ensure lasting change,” Stevens says.

ActionStation’s People’s Mental Health Review spokesperson Kyle MacDonald says the inquiry is a rare opportunity for Kiwi’s voices to be heard.

“So many people struggle to access the help they need, when they need it,” MacDonald says. “The inquiry needs to clearly outline practical solutions that make the right help available.”

Life Matters Suicide Prevention Trust spokesperson Corinda Taylor who lost her twenty-year-old son to suicide says the coalition’s goal is to ensure people feel safe and supported to take part.

“People who have been silenced, stigmatised and marginalised will need support to speak out,” Taylor says. “We need to make the change needed so other families don’t go through what my family and others have gone through.”

Public Service Association national secretary Erin Polaczuk says the union will continue to work with coalition partners and community groups to build a platform to achieve lasting change.

“Mental health demand increased by more than 70% since the last Government came to power in 2008, but funding has been for less than half of what’s needed,” Polaczuk says. “It took the people using and working in mental health services standing together to achieve this goal, and it will take our continued effort to ensure mental health workers get the funding and resources they need to serve our communities.”

Maternal Care Action Group spokesperson and mum Kristina Paterson says everyone can volunteer in the coalition’s campaign and the support of those not directly impacted is critical.

“The thousands of mums and babies affected by perinatal depression* due to delayed diagnosis and treatment need your help,” Paterson says. “This is our moment, help us and be a part of it.”

The public can sign up to the campaign, volunteer and donate at YesWeCare.nz.

ENDS

For editors

YesWeCare.nz is a new health coalition of health service users and their whanau, people bereaved by suicide, community groups and people working in health and their unions.

The coalition and its members’ campaigns were key to making mental health a key election issue. In the lead up to the election, the health coalition collected more than 150,000 petition signatures, shared a thousand personal stories, took 606 shoes across New Zealand, each representing a kiwi lost to suicide, and got a commitment for an inquiry from every party except National and Act.

Life Matters Suicide Prevention Trust ran the first petition calling for an inquiry into our mental health crisis in November 2016. The trust’s latest petition has 85,000 signatures. (http://goo.gl/inb23U).
Hana Ready and YesWeCare.nz’s petition calling for an inquiry after Mrs Ready’s 15-year-old took her life, has 56,000 signatures (http://change.org/mydaughter/)
The People’s Mental Health Report calling for an inquiry collected 500 stories and made four recommendations was signed by more than 10,000 Kiwis including prominent New Zealanders (https://www.peoplesmentalhealthreport.com/)
The Bereaved Whanau Network and the Public Service Association took 600 pairs of shoes, each representing a Kiwi lost in the last year to suicide across New Zealand, in the lead up to the election.
YesWeCare.nz shared a further 500 stories in the media in the lead up to the election.

  • Perinatal depression relates to pre and post birth.

Contacts

YesWeCare.nz co-ordinator and media liaison Simon Oosterman is available on 027 526 8704.
ActionStation spokesperson Marianne Elliott is available in Wellington on 021 110 6086, including at Parliament after 4 pm following the announcement.
Bereaved Whanau Network spokesperson Jane Stevens is available for interview in Ngāruawāhia or Hamilton on 021 222 0191.
Life Matters Suicide Prevention Trust spokesperson Corinda Taylor is available in Dunedin for 021 293 0094.
Maternal Care Action Group spokesperson Kristina Paterson is available in Auckland on 022 093 1822.
People’s Mental Health Inquiry spokesperson and Psychotherapist Kyle MacDonald is available for interview in Auckland on 021 708 689 between 9 am – 11 am, 12 noon – 1 pm and 3 pm – 6 pm.
PSA National Secretary Erin Polaczuk is available for interview in Wellington on 021 793 075 before 4 pm. PSA National Secretary Glen Barclay will be available for interview on 027 295 5110 outside Parliament at 4 pm following the announcement.

579 shoes start the journey to Parliament

579 shoes, representing each Kiwi lost to suicide in 2016, start their journey to parliament from Whangarei, Auckland and Invercargill today.

The shoes will be setup at the Canopy bridge in Whangarei and the Gala Street entrance to Queens Park in Invercargill from 11am.

A separate collection of shoes will travel around Auckland, starting in Aotea Square at 11am.

Events are listed at: http://facebook.com/yeswecare.nz/events/

The shoes were blessed in Bluff and Cape Reinga yesterday.

They will travel across the country and arrive on parliament grounds on September 10, International Suicide Prevention Day.

The North and South Island collections have shoes for eight children aged 10 to 14, 51 teenagers, 419 adults and 101 older adults over sixty who lost their lives.

70% are men’s shoes.

17 are gumboots for farmers and farm workers.

In each town a bereaved local will share a personal story about loss and the hope they have for a change in government policy.

Each speaker, many who have never shared their story before, will hold a pair of their loved ones shoes.

The YesWeCare.nz health funding coalition and the Public Service Association, New Zealand’s mental health union, is supporting the events.

YesWeCare.nz coordinator Simon Oosterman says bereaved families want politicians to have the courage to put politics aside and “do what’s right”.

“Hearing the number 579 is shocking, seeing 579 empty shoes is something else ,” he says. “Too many of our loved ones are reaching out for help and not getting support because our mental health services are in crisis.”

Oosterman says families are calling for a national suicide reduction target, an urgent independent inquiry into our mental health crisis and restore $2.3b of funding needed to cover our ageing and growing population since 2008.

Jonathan Coleman vetoed setting a suicide reduction target.

National refuses to hold an independent inquiry despite 77% of New Zealanders wanting one, he says.

“The gap between demand and funding is growing as funding hasn’t kept up with our ageing and growing population with increased mental health needs,” he says. “Demand for mental health services have increased by 60% since 2008 with funding to 2017 only increased by half that.”

The Government announced an addition 1.2% in funding in the March Budget.

This includes a $225m fund including $100m for social investment.

But analysis by the doctors union (ASMS) found the Government was only putting $18m of new money in for 2017/18.

Oosterman says with demand expected to be 7.3% this year, the Government has cut funding in real terms even further.

Two bereaved New Zealanders are supporting families in each island.

Jane Stevens, from Waikato, is supporting the North Island events.

Mrs Steven’s son Nicky, 21, went missing from a mental health inpatient unit on 9 March 2015.

His body was found on 12 March.

Diane Hill, from Nelson, is supporting the South Island events.

Mrs Hill lost her husband Jake, 45, on 22 October 2014.

She says her husband, “a typical bloke” who worked up until his death, was also let down by an underfunded mental health system.

Stevens is carrying a pair of her son’s shoes with her across the country and Hill is carrying her husbands work boots.

Oosterman says the campaign will announce which parties support bereaved families political demands on Tuesday 29 August at the Hamilton shoe event.

The event will be held at Nicky Stevens memorial besides the Waikato river where his body was found.

Mrs Stevens and her husband, Waikato DHB board member Dave McPherson, were the first to publicly call for an independent inquiry.

Bereaved families from across the country will meet with politicians face to face on September 11 in an intimate meeting open to the media to talk about loss and their hope for change.

September 11 is the first day of advanced voting.

Volunteers donate shoes across the country.

Shoes will be donated to charity after the roadshow finishes.

ENDS

For editors

Key facts, including suicide numbers by age and gender and region can be found at http://yeswecare.nz/the-shoe-project/facts
Event dates can be found at http://facebook.com/yeswecare.nz/events/
Yes We Care’s six election pledges

​Set a suicide reduction target

​Hold a mental health inquiry
​Restore $2.3b in health funding
​Increase primary health, GP funding
​Commit to safe staffing
Make every home healthy
Contacts

Jane Stevens and Diane Hall and families in each town are available for interview through YesWeCare.nz coordinator Simon Oosterman on 027 526 8704.

What we did in 2017

This holiday season we want to share what we achieved together in 2017 and how you can help in 2018.

We had an ambitious goal to make our mental health crisis and health under-funding key election issues. Our eight-month campaign finished with 606 shoes, each for a Kiwi lost to suicide in the last year, arriving at Parliament. By the following day every party except National and Act committed to our six crowd-sourced election health pledges. By election day, media said health and mental health were top election issues.

Here’s how together we did it
Surveyed 6,000 people working in health. It found nine in 10 felt under resourced.
Collected more than a thousand stories and shared more than 300 in the media. They included health service-users and their families, families bereaved by suicide and people working in health.
Travelled across New Zealand raising awareness about health and mental health underfunding. We took 200 life-sized cut-outs of health workers missing due to underfunding with us. It was covered in 40 prominent stories in local and national media. We published daily videos and our roadshow trailer was seen by 50,000.
Ran a poll that found only 13% thought the National Government was doing enough around mental health.
Supported community groups to tell their story in the media.
Ran a grassroots health funding conference.
Supported courageous life-saver Danielle MacKay to get a cochlear implant. She was going deaf and had been waiting for more than three years. Our 26,000 strong-petition for Danielle pressured the National government to fund 60 more implants.
Collected 22,000 signatures for Rachel Palmer. Rachel has been bedridden for two and a half years because the National government denied her treatment for Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes.
Developed six crowdsourced health pledges which every party committed to, except National and Act.
Ran health candidate forums across the country.
Took 606 shoes, each representing a Kiwi lost to suicide, across New Zealand. We raised awareness about suicide and called for an urgent independent mental health inquiry. It was covered by more than 100 stories, opinion pieces and editorials locally and internationally. A number of videos went viral including 1.5m views on a video for BBC and another with almost 300,000 views. One Radio NZs story was one of their most viewed ever.
Designed and helped put up a cheeky billboard in Jonathan Coleman’s North Shore electrorate with ActionStation.
Collected 37,000 signatures for Hana Reedy’s petition for an independent inquiry into our mental health crisis. A month earlier, her 15-year-old daughter took her life after not getting the care she needed.
Supported families bereaved by suicide to build a national democratic voice.
Met with the new health minister to ensure the mental health inquiry is independent. We want to ensure the voice of service-users, people bereaved by suicide, and people working in mental health are at the forefront.
Warning: Video mentions suicide

What we’re going to do in 2018
Continue to support bereaved families to build their own organisation. Sign up here.
Support Kiwis to take part in the mental health inquiry. It will begin in early 2018. Sign up here.
Support people working in health and mental health. We should be treated with respect, be paid enough to thrive and not just survive, and have safe workloads.
I’d like to make a final thank-you to the Public Service Association members who funded YesWeCare.nz and made this all possible.

Enjoy your holidays season, and know we are very grateful for your support.

Thanks,

Simon Oosterman

On behalf of the YesWeCare.nz coalition and the Public Service Association

2017 election pledges

The following letter was sent to all political parties. National and Act did not respond.

Dear political parties and candidates,
As families who have lost loved ones to suicide, we know a bit about courage. We’ve had to ask ourselves difficult, uncomfortable questions.

We need you to have courage too. We need you to ask difficult questions about our mental health system. You’ll need the courage to put aside politics and do what is right for every Kiwi.

We write to ask you to support the YesWeCare.nz coalition’s six election pledges to ensure every Kiwi gets the care they need, when they need it:

Set a suicide reduction target
Set a suicide reduction target taking into account the World Health Organisation’s recommendation of 10% by 2020.

NZ has the highest youth suicide rates in the OECD. 579 people died by suicide in 2015/2016. Nothing will change without a clear, measurable target to give focus and accountability. A goal gives hope. If we don’t have a clear target how will we ever achieve our aspiration of zero suicides? The Ministry of Health’s Independent Suicide Prevention Advisory panel recommended one. So did the Director of Mental Health. Health Minister Jonathan Coleman

Hold a mental health inquiry
Hold an independent mental health inquiry in the first 100 days of the new Government, and commit to fund what it identifies as needed.

77% of Kiwis support an independent inquiry into mental health service. We need to know how an emergency department can release a teenager who says they want to kill themselves? Or why children have to wait three months for an eating disorder appointment, but the Ministry says this doesn’t happen? Or how the Government says staffing is sufficient when nine out of 10 people working in health feel understaffed

.

Restore $2.3b in health funding
Restore $2.3b of health funding to cover unmet annual health costs, commit to increased costs annually, and fund a national survey on unmet need.

The Senior Doctors’ association (ASMS) and Council of Trade Unions say the Government has underfunded health by $2.3b. Funding hasn’t kept up with our ageing and growing population, increased mental health needs, inflation, wages and new medicines. This mean’s we haven’t been able to maintain our current inadequate levels of service. In mental health this has resulted in delays which can, and have been, deadly. The mantra “do more with less” has become “do less with less”.

Increase primary health, GP funding
Significantly increase primary health funding to bring down GP and primary health costs, including therapies and other mental health needs.

One in six Kiwis can’t afford a GP. We have the worst access to equitable primary health, second only to the United States. The little primary mental health services that exist are inadequate. Only a limited amount of free therapy sessions are available and waiting lists are long. Most can’t afford to go private and go without.

Commit to safe staffing
Commit to evidence-based safe staffing to ensure patient safety and quality care.

Nine in 10 people working in health feel understaffed. People working in health do the best they can with what they’ve got, but they’re stretched and many feel burnt out. 70% feel their workload or work pressure is unreasonable. Unrealistic caseloads and fatigued health workers jeopardise patient safety. Understaffing reduces the ability to provide the level of care people need. Mental health staff often work 16 hour shifts to cover for vacancies.

Make every home healthy
Require landlords to make their rentals warm and dry, and subsidise low-income homeowners to achieve the same for their homes.

Having a healthy place to live is key to physical and mental well-being. Yet 40,000 children in New Zealand are admitted to hospital every year from preventable illnesses linked to poverty and unhealthy homes. Homes should much us feel safe and loved, not sick.

(We shouldn’t even have to ask for the first pledge.)

Don’t let other families go through what we have
As politicians, you can make a real difference to Kiwis when they are most vulnerable. Like any mental health issue, there are three steps to getting help. You need to acknowledge we have a mental health crisis, provide us support and do something about it. Don’t get stuck at the first stage, have the courage to take every step. Suicide is preventable and good policy is key.

Taking no action leaves the responsibility on the bereaved, service-users and their families, and a stretched workforce. We’ve already got enough to deal with.

There is hope. We believe working with you collaboratively is an important part of our healing process.

Yours sincerely,

Corinda Taylor, mother of Ross, 20
Maria Dillon, mother of Harry, 18
Patrice Harrex, mother of Brad, 25
On behalf of bereaved families in the YesWeCare.nz coalition.

All political parties agreed to our pledge except National and Act who didn’t respond to this letter.

The following organisations support this open letter:
ActionStation
Ambulance Professionals First / First Union
Council of Trade Unions
E tū
Life Matters Suicide Prevention trust
Maternal Care Action Network
New Zealand Nurses Organisation
Parents of Children With Additional Needs (POCAN)
Peoples’ Mental Heatlh Review
Public Service Association
Tertiary Education Union (TEU)
Unite
United Community Action Network Aotearoa NZ

Home

Since 2008, demand for mental health services has increased by more than 70%. Yet the previous Government increased funding by less than half that. The gap between demand and funding meant hospitals have turned away families struggling with kids in life threatening situations.
The Mental Health Inquiry is a unique opportunity to fix our crisis – if real voices are heard.
Real change needs real voices. Many have been silenced, marginalised and stigmatised. An inquiry will only listen to those who turn up. We need to actively support vulnerable Kiwis to speak out safely.
This is our moment. Make it count.
We made mental health a key election issue by building political pressure and momentum. We did it by sharing personal stories about Kiwis affected by our mental health crisis and their hope for change. With your help we can build the momentum needed to get the care and services we need and which lasts longer than a single election cycle.
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WHERE TO GET HELP:

If you are worried about your or someone else’s mental health, the best place to get help is your GP or local mental health provider. However, if you or someone else is in danger or endangering others, call 111.

If you need to talk to someone, the following free helplines operate 24/7:

DEPRESSION HELPLINE: 0800 111 757
LIFELINE: 0800 543 354
NEED TO TALK? Call or text 1737
SAMARITANS: 0800 726 666
YOUTHLINE: 0800 376 633 or text 234

For others, click here.

Authorised by Erin Polaczuk, Public Service Association, 11 Aurora Terrace, Wellington, New Zealand.

The West End Carpet Cleaning Garage – Carpet Cleaning Service

 

In the United States, carpet cleaning West Auckland is found at such a busy intersection. It is always bustling, but it’s all for the best.

The presence of the West End Carpet Cleaning Garage on The Quay means that the business gets busier during the week. On weekdays, car owners head to the Quay to get their carpets cleaned. While there are many more businesses on The Quay than at other times of the day, the garage is busy enough to keep the shop open until well after midnight.

When it comes to doing carpet cleaning, West Auckland is not as good as either Whangaparaoa or the marae on the East End. You’re better off heading to Wellington or Rotorua. However, the shops on the area are popular with some. Therefore, there are carpets from the West End Carpet Cleaning Garage in those places too.

The West End Carpet Cleaning Garage on The Quay has just about everything that you could possibly need to clean your carpets. There are the carpets, cleaning products, steam cleaners, dryers, and so on. It’s all right there, along with the air conditioning and electricity, which also makes it a convenient place to get your carpets cleaned.

The steam cleaner comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. There is one that goes around the room, and another one that will just go up and down the sides of the room. In both cases, the machine looks like a giant bucket with an arm sticking out at the bottom. These machines cost about $200 each, which is a lot for one machine.

There are also carpet cleansers that will clean carpets in a single sweeping motion. You don’t have to move the carpet very far, because it will always stay in the same spot. These machines also have brushes for dirt and dust, which help them to clean carpets more thoroughly.

Dryers are very helpful. Once you’re done cleaning the carpet, it’s easier to get it clean again. Dryers are much cheaper than steam cleaners, because they’re not as noisy.

Vacuums are very useful, because they help you to remove the dirt that comes off the floor. There are two main types of vacuums. There are the regular vacuum, which is used to suck up carpet dust and other bits of dirt. Then there’s the carpet cleaning vacuums, which can clean the floor in one motion.

The real advantage of having these products is that you can use them to clean hard floors, or carpeted areas that are in the kitchen or the bathroom. One of the dryers takes care of the coffee table, and the carpet cleaner can keep a rug clean. The carpet cleaner can clean anything that you need it to, as long as it has a filter.

The dryer also heats up the carpet when it’s cleaning it. This is something that is nice to have in a busy workplace. Even if you don’t use the dryer much, you can still use it to keep your carpet from getting too hot, which can cause it to expand and crack.

There are other services that are available at the West End Carpet Cleaning Garage. They can cut the stains that are on your carpets, and they can clean them as well. These are services that are often offered by businesses that hire carpet cleaners.

The shops are full of customers, but they can’t get any work done because the work is all done on a regular basis. The garage is also a great place to do research, as you can study the different carpets and learn how they work. to determine which type of carpet would be the best for your business.

What Is It Like to Be an Exterior Painter?

If you’re looking for an exciting and rewarding career with lots of job satisfaction and a good prospect of future growth, consider applying to one of the several renowned exterior painters Auckland. The art of painting anything outside is a very diverse field, and there are many different ways to get the job done that would get a less-qualified person fired in most workplaces.

Painting outside has become a highly competitive area of employment in the past few years. It doesn’t matter whether you’re painting the outside of your house or your business or your garden, there are several great careers you can choose from. You’ll be able to work part-time or full-time and make enough money to live on in the suburbs with kids. It doesn’t matter where you live – exterior painters Auckland can help you find your perfect career.

This article will provide you with a little background information about what it’s like to be an exterior painter. After you’ve read this article, you should have a good idea of what you can expect if you decide to apply to work in this field.

Exterior painters live inside the home, they don’t work outside. They paint the interior of the home and do the landscaping and the gardening around the outside of the home. Their most challenging task is to be able to identify areas to paint without damaging them. They must know how to maneuver tools and equipment safely, and they must also be able to navigate difficult terrains and weather conditions.

While there are several tasks they perform, the large part of their job is identifying spots to paint. They often must be trained to work outside because it requires them to be aware of dangerous areas and how to handle the equipment needed to paint properly. Most crews work independently and work as independent contractors, which means they will be responsible for their own safety. If you ever need any further details on what it takes to bean exterior painter, just ask any experienced crew leader you know.

There are two main ways you can find out if you might be a good candidate for exterior painting jobs in Auckland. The first is to contact your local councils, and check the local landscape service providers. Some of these companies will be able to show you some samples of what they can do, so that you can see how they paint outside and if you meet their requirements.

The second way is to contact a crew leader you’ve known for a long time and ask for a referral to a company in the city council’s office. You can meet with them to discuss what you think is best for you, and then go and get some free estimates for painting outside the Auckland region.

You may find it exciting to start working in the commercial area of the commercial painting industry, but the next step is knowing what it takes to get hired as an exterior painters in Auckland. By working with a team leader who knows the commercial painting industry, you can learn more about what’s involved in becoming a successful painter.

Hiring Car Wreckers in Auckland

Car wreckers are the guys who take away the cars that are smashed, burnt, torn apart and otherwise ruined by a crash. The type of damage that a car can suffer can range from physical damage to mechanical or electrical problems. They can also be ones that cause your car to get immobilised.

There are a few things that you should look out for when looking to hire car wreckers in Auckland. First of all, make sure that you have the vehicle details in your hand. This will give you an idea of how much the vehicle is worth. Make sure that you know the reason for the car wrecking and the time when the event occurred.

Be aware that car wreckers are not going to have much regard for the colour of your car. If you have a brightly coloured vehicle, it will not matter to them that you have been involved in a serious car accident. You will have to go through the process of arranging to be transferred to the car wrecking company’s base and to pay for it.

Make sure that the company you are hiring is genuine. You should check with the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) to see if the business is operating according to the rules and regulations. One of the first steps that you need to take when hiring a wrecker is to make sure that they have the required licensing to do the job. Do not be fooled by low cost car wreckers, as they are not licensed to handle cars.

Car wreckers are also not allowed to drive off with your car if it is damaged beyond repair. You must come to an agreement about the amount of compensation that you want to receive from the wrecker. Depending on the nature of the car wreck, it could require considerable repairs.

Make sure that you bring the invoice of the car wreckers with you. This way, you will know what the money you have spent was for. It is also very important that you make sure that the car wreckers are insured.

Once you have satisfied yourself of the insurance, then the next step is to find out if the car wreckers are affiliated with any old insurance companies. If they are, then you can make use of their insurance. However, it is recommended that you get your own insurance coverage as a policy so that you are not liable for damages that are not covered by the wrecker’s insurance.

Another important tip when it comes to hiring car wreckers in Auckland is to make sure that you choose trustworthy wreckers. Although the internet is a very useful tool in this regard, it may not always yield positive results. Make sure that you ask for referrals and try to gather references from the person or company you hire wreckers from.

How to Grow Japanese Cedar Trees

 

Japanese cedar is a monophyletic genus in the pine family, Cryptomeria, once belonging to the Cyperaceae family. It has only one recognized species, Cryptomeria japonica, from which all others are considered subspecies. It’s native to Japan and is now naturalized in other countries, notably China and North America. Some people consider it an endangered species.

The tree is famous for its foliage. In Japan, they refer to it as a Cryptomeria, which literally means “tennis ball tree.” It’s been used for many decorations because of its uniform green foliage, narrow widths and the ability to grow to a great length. It’s very straight with a moderately-to fully-grown height. Its leaves are variegated and arranged asymmetrically, forming a shape that resembles a basketball.

As a wood, Japanese cedar has distinctive reddish-brown tones with black streaks. The bark is grooved and is quite thick, with an unequal base. The trunk is straight with a broad base and tapering heartwood that’s typically clear. The leaves have a cream-colored tinge and the trunk possesses many flowers that bloom in spring.

The most common subspecies are the black and white varieties. The white form has gray-green foliage with white bands and a gray flower that bloom in April. The black form has gray-green foliage with white bands and a black flower. All three varieties grow in the same area but differ in height and habit. The cypress commonly grows in Japan but also grows in North America, in Mexico, in China and in the Philippines. The ‘Elegans’ cultivar is the one with the widest distribution.

The ‘Aqua’ cultivar is native to China and the Philippines and can be found growing in Manchuria, Taiwan and Japan. The leaves are needle-like and the leaves are covered with a creamy-white blue-green foliage that looks like pale milk. The trunk has a straight development and the flowers develop in spring. The ‘Himeno’ has gray-green leaves with red-orange flowers.

In Japan, the ‘Aqua’ cultivar is found mainly in Tokyo. It’s a deciduous wood that prefers full sun. It’s a slow-growing tree with an upright growth habit and comes with large white blooms that reach up to 6 inches. The ‘cryptomeria japonica’ is another fast-growing, often called, the ‘compact’ variety which has a gray-green, rigid branch that stands erect with gray-green leaves and pink flowers.

The Japanese cedar has a wide distribution across mainland Asia and the subcontinent of India. In India, it is known as the japonica and is famous for its durability and strength. However, this hardy tree is also used for other applications including the production of paper, ink and clothing. The Chinese conifers are considered as a premium hardwood trees due to their disease resistance and flexibility, while they are highly sought after in the lumber industry for their natural blue color that adds dimension to the product.

The most important information regarding planting cedar is that the young shoots do not come up until after the tree flowers, so all cuttings should be taken when the tree flowers. The young shoots will need a support structure or a trellis to help them reach maturity. The best time of year to plant and grow a cedar tree is during the monsoon season, from December to March, as this is the most ideal time to prune the tree. Pruning the tree stimulates new growth and encourages the wood to change color with new growth.

Cedar trees usually grow to three to five feet in height with the distinctive straight spines. The limbs of the cedar tree are straight, so if you want your garden design to have a natural look, you should plant the trees in groups of four to six. The best time to prune these trees is right after the tree blooms. If you do not want to change the direction of the tree, you can leave some of the branches intact and wait for the rest to grow naturally. The trees of Japan are known to be highly prolific cutters, producing up to 80% of the wood they harvest annually.

There are several different cultivars of Japanese cedar tree available in the market today. Some are oil-based, while others are insect resistant. A few decades back, there were only a few cultivars available but they were not very popular due to the fact that they didn’t last long. The third cultivar, which is the non-oil cultivar, is the most popular today. It is known for its resistance to insects, diseases, and changing weather conditions as well as being very resistant to pruning. The wood of the Japanese cedar tree is very durable and strong.

When it comes to maintenance, these two different cultivars require nothing more than regular watering and pruning to keep them healthy and to make sure they last for many years. Some of the more popular cultivars, however, may require that you take some precautions to protect them from harsh weather conditions. They may need to spend a little more time outdoors each day, for example. Partial shade is one way that Japanese cedar can remain attractive year after year, even in harsher climates. You just need to learn how to care for them properly.

NZ Contemporary Art – Past, Present and Future

 

The New Zealand contemporary art movement is now at an all-time high. In 1986 there was a grand opening of the Auckland Arts Centre called ARTYA. This was the start of what has become a major exhibition and art movement in New Zealand. Since then there has been an explosion in interest in contemporary art in NZ. It has grown into a significant and thriving industry which exhibits not only contemporary art but also contemporary design and sculpture from various artists.

The first Artex, named ARTEX 86 was held at the Princes Wharf Passenger Terminal Building, Auckland New Zealand from 27 July 1986 to 3 September 1986. This was a major exhibition of paintings and sculpture by Peter Young. It was won first prize in the category of best Contemporary Art exhibition. It was Peter Young’s second exhibition as part of the New Zealand Contemporary Art Festival which was cancelled later that year due to lack of funding. His other major works from this period are The Belfry ( 1986), Landscape ( 1987), Landscape ( 1988), Landscape ( 1990), Busted (1990), Busted (1991), Still Life ( 1991), Still Life ( 1992) and Sun ( 1993).

After this New Zealand contemporary art exhibition artist began to work with the National Gallery of New Zealand in Wellington and also began travelling around to participate in international art and culture events. At this point Peter Young decided to form a group called the New Zealand International Contemporary Art Association (NZIA). These were a group of young artists who were interested in travelling and participating in international events and exhibitions as well as maintaining a consistent presence in gallery exhibitions and buying/selling venues in New Zealand and abroad. Their association took its first official meeting in December 1987 and remains today a strong and successful business organisation dedicated to promoting and networking between New Zealand artists and art buyers and sellers.

Another early member of the New Zealand contemporary art association was Michael Young, a painter and illustrator from Christchurch who was known for his radical and political paintings. Michael was to become a strong participant in the Anti-Globalization and Anti Corporatisation movements and was also to popularise street arts through his art. He was to meet with many other artists during the time he was exhibiting in New Zealand exhibitions and began travelling around the country which led to him meeting with other artists, some of whom he would later become friends with including John Pilsworth, John Key, Bob Coles, Warren Smith and Craig Wright. During this period, he also began to focus on travelling and participating in art events and exhibitions as well as buying and selling paintings in various formats. After travelling around the country, Michael realised that there was room for independent New Zealand artists to create art and develop careers.

The National Gallery of New Zealand, under the management of John Sullivan, did not respond positively to this growth in the field of new Zealand contemporary art and so they changed the format of their exhibits and invited local and international artists to submit examples of their work. Some of these included local artist Ron English, who was to feature in an exhibition entitled Walls of Language at the Gallery in Picton. At the same time, John Sullivan declined an invitation to be a featured artist at Christening in honour of Queen Victoria. An exhibition entitled New Zealand at the International Association of Fine Arts and Sculpture was hosted by the Gallery and featured local and international artists such as Frankrollersz, Richard Uttman, Peter Young, Rhodri Twedderers and David Lang. These were just a small fraction of the New Zealand contemporary art scene at that point in time.

At the end of February or beginning of March, the NZ Art Gallery hosted an exhibition entitled An Artist’s Exhibition: Celebrating Excellence in Contemporary Art in Auckland at their Gallery. This was a well received and highly publicized event that showcased work from a range of well known and respected New Zealand contemporary artists. One of the highlights of the exhibition was the announcement of the recipient of the prestigious Manus Prize, which is an annual merit award given by the New Zealand Society for the Arts and Design. Manus Prize committee member and artist Rosie Telford received the Lifetime Achievement Award for her contributions to the field of contemporary art in New Zealand. The announcement of the Manus Prize in Auckland was met with both delight and anticipation by many New Zealanders who enjoy the visual and performing arts.

The following month, in April, the second annual NZ Ascentennial Festival took place at Auckland’s Parklands Hotel, offering a range of events that included music, theatre and film. A select group of well known and respected New Zealanders were invited to share the Festival with the wider public. The invited artists were Ann Tran Clark, Philip Kennell and Zane Hemstrup. The festival showcased the best in contemporary new artists from around New Zealand including Corin Rago, Jade Johns and John Flough. In addition to the renowned names, this exhibition was notable with an exhibition of contemporary art by non-New Zealand artists that showcased non-traditional materials and themes such as pottery and kiwi designs.

In June the third exhibition of the year, Kiwi Contemporary Art, was hosted by artist Katarina Beyer. This exhibition was supported by the Wellcome Collection and was designed to celebrate New Zealand’s contemporary artists against the backdrop of the iconic Harbour Bridge. A range of works from some of the country’s most talented artists including Joseph Reed and David Walsh were showcased in this exhibition.